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Some people believe that a crime is a result of social problems and poverty, others think that crime is a result of bad person’s nature. Discuss both views and give your opinion

It is generally believed that inborn characteristics are the reasons leading to criminal problems. However, I would argue that a [1] crime is an undeniable consequence of social issues and poverty. There is a belief that a criminal is the result of a person's nature. Firstly, a person who is cruel easily commits a crime. In particular, a small child bullying other boys or girls at school is more likely to commit murder or have take violent actions in years to come. Secondly, bad characteristics including laziness and selfishness could also build up breed [2] future offenders. It cannot be denied that a number of youngsters, instead of working to earn a living, choose to steal from other people. It seems that people who are born with an inborn negative nature are likely to be accused of [3] crimes. Nevertheless, it seems to me that social issues and poverty are primary reasons behind a [1] crime. First and foremost, problems in society could lead to an increasing number of crimes. For example, unemployment pushes an array of people to work illegally to earn their livings. As a consequence, the number of offenders has climbed in recent years. Furthermore, the situation of poverty is also claimed to be one of the main reasons leading to unlawful problems [4] criminal acts. It is undeniable that if their standard of living cannot allow people to meet basic needs, they would will do pursue [5] illegal activities to make money so that they could support their family. Consequently, criminal issues would become increasingly serious. In conclusion, while a number of people think that a person's nature is the primary cause of crimes, I would argue that they are the results of social issues and poverty.
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